ClassInfo

ANI 206 History of Animation

Office: CDM 502
Fall 2015-2016
Class number: 11428
Section number: 403
MW 1:30PM - 3:00PM
14EAS 00801 Loop Campus

Summary

HISTORY OF ANIMATION FALL 2015
M,W. 1:30 - 3
INSTRUCTOR: Lisa Barcy (lbarcy@cdm.depaul.edu) 

Office Hours: M,W, 10 ? 1:30, Fridays by appointment, best to email me first

Summary Of Course: 
This course is an introduction to the history and development of the field of animation. We will explore this subject from various perspectives: from mass entertainment to avant garde art form, chronologically, culturally, and by concentrating on the figures who have shaped the art form and continue to influence it through their example. Students are expected to bring an enthusiastic interest in the medium, and to devote serious effort to reading about, viewing, researching and discussing animation and the artists who have created it.
During our examination of the artwork, we will pay special attention to the attitudes and influences of race, gender, technology, culture, and the correlation between art and industry. There are several writing assignments, reading questions, and quizzes throughout the quarter, in addition to a final exam. Prereq. - none
Course Objectives and Learning Goals: 
To instill an appreciation of the technical and artistic contributions of animators throughout history.
To build the students critical vocabulary, and to encourage reflective criticism (both oral and written) of works of animation.
To gain an understanding of the economic, social and technological contexts that has shaped animations development around the world.
To learn to trace and recognize historical influences on later styles and forms.
To discover lesser-known work from under-represented genres and cultures, and the value of their diversity.
To explore the varied potential of animation as an entertaining, expressive and meaningful art form.
*Liberal Studies Arts and Literature Domain
Description
ANI 206 is included in the Liberal Studies program as a course with credit in the Arts and Literature Domain. Courses in the Arts and Literature Domain ask students to extend their knowledge and experience of the arts by developing their critical and reflective abilities. In these courses, students interpret and analyze particular creative works, investigate the relations of form and meaning, and through critical and/or creative activity to come to experience art with greater openness, insight, and enjoyment. These courses focus on works of literature, art, theatre, or music as such, though the process of analysis may also include social and cultural issues. Students who take course in this domain choose three courses from such choices as literature, the visual arts, media arts, music, and theater. No more than two courses can be chosen from one department or program.
Grading Policy 

Grading
A = 100-93, A- = 92-90, B+ = 89-88, B = 87-83, B- = 82-80, C+ = 79-78, C = 77-73, C- = 72-70, D+ = 69-68, D = 67-63, D- = 62-60, F = 59-0.
A indicates excellence, B indicates good work, C indicates satisfactory work, D work is unsatisfactory in some respect, F is substantially unsatisfactory work.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: World History of Animation ? by Stephen Cavalier. 

Course reserves can be found at http://eres.lib.depaul.edu/(password ani206)
Attendance:
Student absences are not expected to exceed more than 10% (2 absences) of the number of the classes scheduled for the semester. A third absence will result in the lowering of your final grade one full letter. Any student missing 4 classes will be given a grade of F for the semester.
Tardiness:
Tardiness is defined as not in the classroom when attendance is called or departing before the class has been formally dismissed by the instructor. Tardiness that exceeds thirty minutes will be counted as an absence. TWO late arrivals or early departures, or a combination of both, are counted as one absence. If you arrive late for class, it is your responsibility to make sure that you have been marked tardy rather than absent.
The largest impact of absences will be on your quiz performance. All films shown and discussed in class are fair game for quiz questions, as is any other subject that we discuss, whether in the reading or not.
Cell phones policy:
Use of cell phones in the class is prohibited. Please turn it off before entering class. Repeated failure to turn off your phone will result in a lowered grade.

WHAT TO EXPECT IN THIS CLASS 

Screenings: We will be watching many examples of animation, complete when possible, but often just selected parts due to our time constraints.
Note Taking: During screenings may be done with pen and paper. No open laptops or similar devices allowed. If you are surfing the web or checking social media during screenings or class time this will negatively affect your final grade.
Reading Assignments: REQUIRED BEFORE EACH CLASS
This class will require 40+ pages of reading per week. There are four graded reading assignments that will be posted to D2L under the Assignments section. All reading assignments will be listed on D2L and have reading questions assigned with them. These reading questions are also required and can be used as study guides.
Course reserves can be found at library.depaul.edu
Go to ?Services? and choose ?Course Reserve Services? (password ani206)

Each week?s assigned reading will relate to the most recent or upcoming lecture, and will give you background or critical discussion on the work we will watch. All students are expected to have read the scheduled texts, and to be prepared to participate in our class discussions of the readings and the work screened. Class discussions and reading comprehension questions are considered to be part of your participation grade. Come prepared to be called on and answer.
Film Analysis Writing (Reaction Papers):
The course also requires 3 short papers (approx. 500 words, minimum, per paper) where you will respond to, deconstruct and analyze short films that are screened throughout the quarter. There is a lot of choice on your part as to which film you can write about, and I will specify in class if a particular film should not be written about. Please refer to the Documents section of D2L for guidelines.
Quizzes:
There are four quizzes scheduled for the quarter that will cover information from the lectures, readings and screenings of the previous two weeks.
Each week I will post a related PowerPoint presentation along with relevant links to films. Please refer to the PPTs, as well as the lecture and films screened in class when studying for the quizzes.
Final Exam: The final exam will be comprehensive and cover broader topics from the course. There is no mid-term exam.
Always check D2L for updates

Grading Breakdown
3 quizzes: 5 points each
 - 15%
3 film analysis papers: 10 points each
- 30%
4 reading assignments with reading questions: 10 points each
- 40%
1 final exam: 15%
















THE SCHEDULE
WEEK 1 - 9/5
The evolution of animation/cinema in France and the United States
The first true animators - Cohl, McKay, Starevitch, etc. 
 European Experimentation
Note guidelines for Film Analysis Papers, post on D2l under Content > WEEK 1 and under the Dropbox. Please note due dates.
Reading Assignment: Cavalier ? pp. 15-33, 36-53, 58-59, 62-64, 73, 88 ? 91 
Course reserves: Experimental Animation: Illustrated Anthology - interview w/ Len Lye, pp 65-69 (course reserves)

 Quiz #1 on Wednesday of next week

WEEK 2 - 9/14, 9/16
US studio system - Patents, Fleischer Brothers early successes

Reading: 54-57, 82-87, 110, 114, 117, 125
Course Reserves: Before Mickey, Chapter 6 ? The Animation Shops
Complete reading questions for next week.
First Reaction Paper due on Wednesday of next week

WEEK 3 - 9/21 ? 9/23
Review Reading Questions
#1 - First Film Analysis due
Walt Disney?s beginnings
Reading: Cavalier ? 66-69, 74-79, 81, 97, 98, 100, 105- 108, 115
Course Reserves ? 1. Live From Trumps, by Charles Soloman, 2. That's Enough Folks ? Sampson, chapter 1, 3. Forbidden Animation, Cohen, chapter 2 ? Racism and Resistance: Stereotypes in Animation
 Quiz#2 next week

WEEK 4 - 9/28, 9/30
Warner Bros. Golden Era of Theatrical Shorts - Chuck Jones, Tex Avery, Banned, Racist cartoons & WW2 propaganda films

Readings: Cavalier: 118 ?126, 128- 132, 136- 137, 141-142.
Course Reserves ? 1. Narrative Strategies for Resistance and Protest - William Mortiz 2. Animation Art - NFB: The Beginnings/ Norman McClaren pp. 100 ? 103

Reading Questions due Monday of next week
Second Reaction Paper Due Wednesday of next week
WEEK 5 - 10/5, 10/7
Review Reading Questions #2
- Second Film Analysis due
on Wed.
Animation behind the Iron Curtain
Norman McLaren and the NFB
Reading: Course Reserves ? 1. We Could Get Away With Less by Stephan Kanfer
2. Cartoon Modern ? United Productions of America ? Amid Amidi
 Quiz# 3 next week

WEEK 6 - 10/12, 10/14
The stylistic legacy of the UPA,
HUAC and Animation
Work by John and Faith Hubley, The birth of TV animation.
Reading: Cavalier:
Course Reserves:

Reading Questions due Monday of next week
Third Reaction Paper due Wednesday of next week

WEEK 7 - 10/19, 10/21
3rd Film Analysis due
Review Reading Questions #3

Animation in the 1970's, Films for adults part 1 - Animal Farm, Allegro Non Troppo, Yellow Submarine, Fantastic Planet and Fritz the Cat and more if time.
Stop-motion - From special effects to puppetry on film. O'Brien, Harryhausen, Pal
Reading: Course Reserves ? 1. Unsilent Nights: The Brothers Quay ? Atkinson
2. Experimental Animation: Illustrated Anthology - interview w/ Robert Breer pp. 131 ? 135
3. Masters of Animation, Grant. P. 184
 Quiz#4 next week

WEEK 8 - 10/26, 10/28
Animation as art -More Stop-motion - Svankmeyer, The Quays.
Experimental and independent animators - Bute, Breer, Brakhage, Harry Smith, Terry Gilliam.
Reading: Cavalier: 26 ? 31, 93, 144, 176
Course reserves ? 1. A Page Right Out of History - Patrick Drazen. 2. Why Anime? ? Susan Napier 3. John Canemaker ? Part Human, Part Cartoon
Reading Questions - due on Monday of next week

WEEK 9 - 11/2, 11/4
Review Reading Questions #4
Brief Overview of Final
The return of the feature beginning with Who Framed Roger Rabbit? 
Richard Williams, Tron, Pixar and the birth of CGI
Anime! From manga to the screen. Tezuka and Miyazake 

Reading: Cavalier: 344-345, 366 (Persepolis) 370, 380, 388, 391
Course reserves: Animation Art by Jerry Beck ? Chapter 12: The New Century - CGI Victorious pp. 338 ? 268
Links: http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/persepolis-2008
http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/waking-life-2001-1
Assignment: STUDY FOR THE FINAL

WEEK 10 11/9, 11/11
The future of animation - Animation Everywhere! Festivals, internet, interactive and site specific animation.
Films for grown-ups - Persepolis, Waking Life, Peter and the Wolf
Assignment: STUDY FOR THE FINAL

WEEK 11 - NOVEMBER 18, 11:30 ? 1:45
FINAL EXAM ? ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY ? DO NOT BE LATE




AND NOW, THE OBLIGATORY FINE PRINT

Changes to Syllabus
This syllabus is subject to change as necessary during the quarter. If a change occurs, it will be thoroughly addressed during class, posted under Announcements in D2L and sent via email.
Online Course Evaluations
Evaluations are a way for students to provide valuable feedback regarding their instructor and the course. Detailed feedback will enable the instructor to continuously tailor teaching methods and course content to meet the learning goals of the course and the academic needs of the students. They are a requirement of the course and are key to continue to provide you with the highest quality of teaching. The evaluations are anonymous; the instructor and administration do not track who entered what responses. A program is used to check if the student completed the evaluations, but the evaluation is completely separate from the student?s identity. Since 100% participation is our goal, students are sent periodic reminders over three weeks. Students do not receive reminders once they complete the evaluation. Students complete the evaluation online in CampusConnect.
Academic Integrity and Plagiarism
This course will be subject to the university's academic integrity policy. More information can be found at http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/. If you have any questions be sure to consult with your professor.
Academic Policies
All students are required to manage their class schedules each term in accordance with the deadlines for enrolling and withdrawing as indicated in the University Academic Calendar. Information on enrollment, withdrawal, grading and incompletes can be found at: http://www.cdm.depaul.edu/Current%20Students/Pages/PoliciesandProcedures.aspx

Students with Disabilities

Students who feel they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss their specific needs. All discussions will remain confidential.
To ensure that you receive the most appropriate accommodation based on your needs, contact the instructor as early as possible in the quarter (preferably within the first week of class), and make sure that you have contacted the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) at: csd@depaul.edu.
Lewis Center 1420, 25 East Jackson Blvd.
Phone number: (312)362-8002
Fax: (312)362-6544
TTY: (773)325.7296


School policies:

Changes to Syllabus

This syllabus is subject to change as necessary during the quarter. If a change occurs, it will be thoroughly addressed during class, posted under Announcements in D2L and sent via email.

Online Course Evaluations

Evaluations are a way for students to provide valuable feedback regarding their instructor and the course. Detailed feedback will enable the instructor to continuously tailor teaching methods and course content to meet the learning goals of the course and the academic needs of the students. They are a requirement of the course and are key to continue to provide you with the highest quality of teaching. The evaluations are anonymous; the instructor and administration do not track who entered what responses. A program is used to check if the student completed the evaluations, but the evaluation is completely separate from the student’s identity. Since 100% participation is our goal, students are sent periodic reminders over three weeks. Students do not receive reminders once they complete the evaluation. Students complete the evaluation online in CampusConnect.

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

This course will be subject to the university's academic integrity policy. More information can be found at http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/ If you have any questions be sure to consult with your professor.

Academic Policies

All students are required to manage their class schedules each term in accordance with the deadlines for enrolling and withdrawing as indicated in the University Academic Calendar. Information on enrollment, withdrawal, grading and incompletes can be found at http://www.cdm.depaul.edu/Current%20Students/Pages/PoliciesandProcedures.aspx.

Students with Disabilities

Students who feel they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss their specific needs. All discussions will remain confidential.
To ensure that you receive the most appropriate accommodation based on your needs, contact the instructor as early as possible in the quarter (preferably within the first week of class), and make sure that you have contacted the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) at:
Lewis Center 1420, 25 East Jackson Blvd.
Phone number: (312)362-8002
Fax: (312)362-6544
TTY: (773)325.7296