Research in Human-Computer Interaction

Synopsis of the Research Area

Research in HCI focuses on improving the usability, efficiency, learnability, and general user-friendliness of interactions between people and computers. Naturally, the internet and mobile computing are major areas of current research, but more basic research applies to almost any time of human-computer interaction. At CDM, HCI researchers are examining such diverse areas as web search tools, navigation, game playing, e-commerce, software security, and requirements engineering. The methods used for this research include cognitive modeling, user surveys, threat modeling, and experimentation.

Current Research Projects

Sheena Erete

Social computing, community informatics, designing technologies for local communities to address social issues, facilitate civic engagement, and encourage prosocial behavior.

Xiaowen Fang

Enjoyment of computer game play and personality of players. This project investigates how players' personality interacts with their enjoyment of computer game play through an online survey at http://cgen.cstcis.cti.depaul.edu. Funded by URC and Microsoft.

Development of survey instrument for measuring enjoyment of computer game play based on flow experience. Funded by URC.

Craig Miller

General interests involve the effective design of navigable information spaces such as menu selection and web navigation. Interests also include how people refer to objects in computer commands, particularly in the context of learning how to program. Current projects extend to the areas of cognitive science and computing education.

Cynthia Putnam

Description of recommendations in diverse domains:

Creation and evaluation of web-based knowledge-bases that support information and decision-making tools aimed at helping: (a) therapists learn about and choose commercial games for their patients who have had a brain injury and (b) parents and educators learn about and choose interactive educational technologies/toys for their children/students who have autism.

We have used the game/therapy knowledge-base to create and evaluate a system that presents therapy-centered game design patterns that support game designers who want to create games aimed at BI recovery. In future work, we plan to use the autism/educational technology knowledgebase to inform designs aimed at specific educational goals for children with autism.

Funded by: Two grants from the DePaul/Rosalind Franklin joint research grant program and several from the University Research Council

Collaborators from DePaul include Doris Rusch, Robin Burke, Andre and Jonathan Gemmel.

Students: Dorian Anderson, Jinghui Cheng, Erica Christian, Wayne Hosley and Lukas Nicola

Peer Reviewed Publications in the last three years - note some are posters and demos – so not all listed here are 'full' papers:

  • Putnam, C., Cheng, J., Lin, F., Yalla, S., and Wu, S. (2016). ‘Choose a Game’: Creation and Evaluation of a Prototype Tool to Support Therapists in Brain Injury Rehabilitation. In Proceedings of 2016 Annual ACM Conference on Human factors in Computing systems (CHI '16), San Jose, CA, USA.
  • Cheng, J., Putnam, C. (2016). ‘Choose a Game’: A Prototype Tool to Support Therapists Use Games in Brain Injury Rehabilitation. Demonstration presented at 2016 annual conference on Human factors in computing system, CHI '16, May 7-12, San Jose, CA, USA. (Demo).
  • Cheng, J., Putnam C., and Rusch, D. (2015). Towards Efficacy-Centered Game Design Patterns For Brain Injury Rehabilitation: A Data-Driven Approach. Annual ACM Conference on Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS '15, In Proceedings of the October 26-28, Lisbon, Portugal.
  • Cheng, J. and Putnam C. (2015). Therapeutic Gaming in Context: Observing Game Game Use for Brain Injury Rehabilitation. In Proceedings of the 2015 annual conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing system, CHI EA '15, April 18-23, Seoul, Korea. (Poster)
  • Cheng, J., Putnam, C., and Rusch, D. (2015). ‘Choose a Game’: Creation and Evaluation of a Prototype Tool to Support Therapists in Brain Injury Rehabilitation.Demonstration presented at Annual ACM Conference on Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS '15, October 26-28, Lisbon, Portugal. (Demo)
  • Putnam, C. and Cheng, J. (2014). Therapist-Centered Requirements: A Multi-Method Approach of Requirement Gathering to Support Rehabilitation Gaming. In Proceedings of International Conference on Requirements Engineering, RE 2014, August 25-29, Kariskrona, Sweden.
  • Putnam, C., Cheng, J. & Seymour, G. (2014). Therapist Perspectives: Active Video Games Use in In-patient Settings for People with Brain-Injuries. Games for Health Journal, 3(6), 366-370.
  • Putnam, C. and Cheng, J. (2013). Therapist Perspectives: Motion-based Video Games Use In An In-patient Setting For Brain-Injured Patients. Annual ACM Conference on Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS '13, October 21-23, Bellevue, WA, USA. (Poster)
  • Putnam, C., Cheng, J, Rusch, D, Berthiaume, A and Burke, R. (2013). Supporting Therapists in Motion Gaming for Brain Injury Rehabilitation. In Proceedings of the 2013 annual conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing system, CHI EA '13, April 29-May 2, Paris, France. (Poster)

Description of UX Pedagogy and Practice

In this work, we are investigating how human-computer interaction (HCI) and user experience (UX) professionals do their jobs. Specifically, we have explored:

  • How professionals define their work, how definitions change over time and how definitions differ regionally and/or among companies.
  • Methods used to explore end-user goals, needs and desires, e.g., how accessibility is considered.
  • Methods used to communicate about end-users among different professional roles.
  • How UX/HCI is taught at the University level; specifically, we have researched how accessibility is taught.

Funded by: Several grants from the University Research Council

Students: Mace Allen, Morgan Caputo, Jinghui Cheng, Maria Dahman, Carl Duffield, Aaron Reiner, Emily Ryou, Ravali Singamaneni, Katherine Wozniak, and Mary Jo Zefeldt

Peer Reviewed Publications in the last three years (note the last one is a poster):

  • Putnam, C., Dahman, M., Rose, E., Cheng, J., and Bradford, G. (2016). Best practices for Teaching Accessibility in Universities of Classrooms: Cultivating Awareness, Understanding and Appreciation for Diverse Users. ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing, 8(4), Article No. 13.
  • Putnam, C., Reiner, A., Ryou, E., Caputo, M., Cheng, J., Allen, M., and Singamaneni, R. (2016). Human-Centered Design in Practice: Roles, Definitions, and Communication. Submitted to Journal of Technical Writing and Communication. (Accepted: in press).
  • Putnam C. Dahman M., Rose, E., Cheng, J., and Bradford, G. (2015). Teaching Accessibility, Learning Empathy. In Proceedings of Annual ACM Conference on Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS '15, October 26-28, Lisbon, Portugal. (Poster)

Adam Steele

URC grant on touch screen electronic voting.

Students

Miaoqi Zhu, Ph.D. student. Advisor: Xiaowen Fang. Works focuses on the enjoyment of computer game play and personality project.

Paula Laurent (PhD student). Advisor: Adam Steele.

Recent Publications

  • Putnam C. and Kolko, B. (2012). HCI Professions: Differences and definitions. In Proceedings of the 2012 annual conference extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems (CHI EA '12), Austin, TX, USA, May 5-10.
  • Under review
    Putnam C., Wozniak, K, Cheng, J., Zefeldt, M., Capato, M and Duffield, C. (2012) How do computing professionals consider accessibility? Submitted to: ProceedingsASSETS 2012.
  • Fang, X., Chan, S., Brzezinski, J., and Nair, C. (2010). Development of an Instrument to Measure Enjoyment of Computer Game Play. Accepted for publication on International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction.M
  • Xu, S., Fang, X., and Chan, S. (2009). Development of a dual-modal information presentation of sequential relationship. International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organization, 3(3), 223-242.
  • Xu, S., Fang, X., Brzezinski, J., and Chan, S. (2008). Development of a Dual-Modal Presentation of Texts for Small Screens. International Journal of Human Computer Interaction, 24(8), 776-793.
  • Fang, X., Brzezinski, J., Xu, S., and Chan, S. (2006). A study of the feasibility and effectiveness of dual-modal information presentations. International Journal of Human Computer Interaction, 20(1), 3-17.
  • Fang, X., Chan, S., Brzezinski, J., and Xu, S. (2005). Moderating Effects of Task Type on Wireless Technology Acceptance. Journal of Management Information Systems, Winter 2005-6, 22(3), 125-160.
  • R. Omanson, C. S. Miller, E. Young and D. Schwantes (2010). Comparison of Mouse and Keyboard Efficiency. Accepted for inclusion in Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Proceedings.
  • S. Wu and C. S. Miller (2008). Top-down and bottom-up processes in web search navigation. In B. C. Love, K. McRae, & V. M. Sloutsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 64-70). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.
  • S. Wu and C. S. Miller (2007). Preliminary evidence for top-down and bottom-up processes in web search navigation. In CHI '07 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (San Jose, CA, USA, April 28 - May 03, 2007). CHI '07. ACM, New York, NY, 2765-2770.
  • C. S. Miller, S. Fuchs, N. Anantharaman, and P. Kulkarni (2007). Comparing two methods for predicting navigation problems in information hierarchies. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Proceedings (pp. 363-367). Santa Monica, CA: HFES. An earlier version of this paper appeared as Evaluating Category Membership for Information Architecture, January 2007.DePaul CTI Technical Report 07-001.
  • X. Jia, A. Steele, L. Qin, H. Liu and C. Jones, Executable visual software modeling -- the ZOOM approach, Software Quality Journal, January, 2007. Published by Springer. Archival Conference Proceedings.
  • Steele A., X. Jia, "Adversary Centered Design: Threat Modeling Using Anti-Scenarios, Anti-Use Cases and Anti-Personas". IKE 2008: July 14-17, 2008, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.
  • X. Jia, H. Liu, L. Qin, and A. Steele, "A Model Transformation Framework for Model Driven Engineering," Workshop on Modelling, Simulation, Verification and Validation of Enterprise Information Systems (MSVVEIS-2008) Barcelona, Spain, 12-16 June, 2008.
  • X. Jia, H. Liu, Lizhang Qin, and A. Steele, "Metamodel Based Model Transformation Framework" The 2008 International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice (SERP'08), July 14-17, 2008, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.
  • X. Jia, H. Liu, L. Qin, and A. Steele, "A Model Transformation Framework for Model Driven Engineering," ICEIS 2008, 10th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems. 2007.
  • H. Liu, L. Qin, X. Jia, and A. Steele, "Model Transformation Framework Supported by ZOOM," The 2007 International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice (SERP'07). June 25-28, 2007, Las Vegas, Nevada.
  • B. L. Kurtz, J. B. Fenwick Jr., C. C. Ellsworth, X. Yuan, A. Steele and X. Jia, Inter-University Software Engineering Using Web Services, In Proceedings of the 38th SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (Covington, Kentucky, USA, March 7 - 10, 2007). SIGCSE '07. ACM Press, New York, NY.