Liberal Studies Courses

Liberal Studies Courses

CDM offers dozens of courses in many domains of the Liberal Studies Program. You can experiment with Screenwriting, Digital Photography, Game Design, Computer Graphics, and Programming and fulfill a requirement at the same time. Many of these courses also serve as gateway courses into more advanced CDM courses.


Liberal Studies Courses Offered by CDM

This list represents Liberal Studies Program (LSP) courses taught by CDM only.
For a complete list of LSP courses, visit the Liberal Studies homepage.
  • Arts and Literature
    • DC 120 Video Editing
      Students analyze and assemble dramatic scenes under a variety of conditions and narrative strategies. Editing theories, techniques and procedures, issues of continuity, effects, movement and sound are examined as they relate to the fundamentals of cinematic montage and visual storytelling. This class presents a variety of topics and experiences that are designed to broaden the student's understanding of the art of cinematic storytelling and montage. Work on more advanced projects is integrated into the class as a means to an understanding of advanced editing tools and techniques.
    • DC 113 Audio for Podcasts and Other Media
      This course is an introduction to the uses and practical applications of sound for multimedia. Students will study various uses of sound and music on the Internet from creative to professional websites. Using free or inexpensive hardware and software, students will learn to create and edit podcasts and attach audio files to programs and web pages such as Facebook, Itunes, Keynote, PowerPoint and other sites. The course will cover both MAC and PC applications so all students will be able to work on projects from their home computers. The course will also cover current legalities of digital media.
    • DC 125 Digital Still Photography for Non-Majors
      This course is an introduction to the history and aesthetics of still photography and to the concept of photography as a descriptive and interpretive artistic medium. Students studying photographs in this context will discover relationships between individual photographers choices and their own understanding of meaning. Students will learn the fundamental concepts necessary to shoot, edit, manipulate, and print digital still photographs.
    • DC 201 Introduction to Screenwriting
      This course focuses on narrative storytelling and encourages students to find their unique voices, while emphasizing the critical importance of working as part of a creative team.
    • DC 202 History of Motion Picture Editing
      This course studies the origins and rise of film editing as an art form, an industry, a set of technological practices ranging from analog film to digital video. The course examines critical historical events that impacted film editing, the emergence of the studio system, the coming of sound, narrative, experimental and documentary film, MTV, and audience shifts. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this question.
    • DC 205 Foundations of Cinema
      Acquisition and computer representation of sound and image. Sound and video standards. Lossy and Lossless compression. Basic computer graphics and rendering. Distribution of digital information.
    • DC 206 History of Cinema Production
      This course studies the origins and rise of film as an art form, an industry, a set of technological practices, and cultural documents. The course examine critical historical events that impacted the industry; the emergence of the studio system, the coming of sound, the U.S. depression, the world wars, audience shifts, emergence of other communication media. We also examine various world film industries in order to understand the relationships existing among national media producers.
    • DC 207 History of Cinema I, 1890-1945
      This course examines the history of cinema as one of the most influential cultural forms of the 20th Century. We will study the aesthetic and technological developments of cinema during its first 50 years, as well as examine the social and economic factors shaping its history. Initially influenced by other art forms (theater, literature, painting) filmmaking quickly acquired its own formal system, language, and traditions. We will trace the changing styles, techniques, content, and methods of filmmaking as an art form, as popular culture, and as an industry. We will consider how cinema is bound to its social context via audience relations, economics, technology, and ideology. The limited scope of this course will cover primarily feature-length, narratives films as the dominant mode of filmmaking, although we will also look at the development of documentary and experimental filmmaking. The class will consist of lectures, screenings, and discussions.
    • DC 208 History of American Cinema, 1946-1975
      From Film Noir to Hitchcock, an examination of post war Hollywood, film noir, wide screen and epic films, the development of the star system, the director as auteur, and the influence of international film movements and directors. Screenings, lecture, and discussion.
    • DC 209 History of Cinema III, 1975-Present
      This final course in the film history sequence is designed to introduce students to a sense of modern film history and the multiple permutations of cinema around the modern film history and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. It presents film history from a global perspective, concentrating primarily on the development of new national and transnational cinemas. The course continues to chart the development of the American studios since the mid-1970s while examining the effects of media consolidation and convergence. Moreover, the course seeks to examine how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood filmmaking on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form of communication in the 21st century.
    • DC 222 Classic Hollywood Film Structure
      This course focuses on the critical analysis of narrative structure in Cinema. Students will learn how to identify key story concepts and break down three act structure in finished films and scripts.
    • DC 233 Cinema and Art
      This course will provide an overview of avant-garde film, video, animation and installation and the relationship of these cinematic forms to Modern and Contemporary art.
    • DC 250 The Art of Screen Acting
      This course is an introduction and examination of the collaborative process between the actor and director. Methods of study include lecture, discussion, assignments, and in-class acting exercises.
    • GAM 224 Game Design for Non-Majors
      Students will learn about a game's "hook", its "high concept" and the crucial needs of marketing for a successful game design. Students will also learn to design a game's component pieces.
    • GD 200 Graphic Design I
      This course introduces the world of graphic design in a social and historical context. The goals are to explore formal structures and research methods with emphasis on the role of analysis and conceptual thinking as the first tasks of the print and multi-media designer. The course includes basic instruction in typography, color, problem-solving in print and on screen.
    • GD 210 Digital Illustration I
      Introduction to illustration development in image, line and photography, combining computer applications and hand-rendered approaches.
    • GD 220 History of Design I
      The history of graphic design is an evolution in aesthetics, technology, style and visual communication. The class will encompass a survey of the major movements in the field of print design, notable designers and design materials. The nature of changing methods, materials, technologies and values are examined in the context of the social and political realities that shape communication. The course will include the historical shift from print to multimedia design methodologies.
    • GPH 211 Perceptual Principles for Digital Environments I
    • GPH 212 Perceptual Principles for Digital Environments II
    • GPH 213 Perceptual Principles for Digital Environments III
      These 3 foundational courses in computer animation take you through the process of creating 2-D and 3-D representations on the computer. The last course teaches you how to animate them.
    • ANI 101 Animation for Non-Majors
      This course introduces a variety of basic animation techniques for cinema and gaming, such as hand-drawn, cutout, stop-motion and (very basic) 3D, with an emphasis on the use of computer technology.
    • ANI 206 History of Animation
      History of Animation: This course is an introduction to the history and development of the field of animation.
  • Junior Experiential Learning Credit
    • CSC 298 Internship
      Computer Science Internship in cooperation with local employers this course offers students the opportunity to integrate their academic experience with on-the-job training in computer related work areas.
    • CSC 378 Software Projects for Community Clients
    • CSC 379 Technology Partnerships in Urban Schools
      Students in this course will have the opportunity to assess urban community needs in the technology arena and develop skills in assisting and developing methods for bridging the digital divide that exists.
    • DC 298 Internship in Media Producton/Post-Production
      This course offers students an excellent opportunity to gain professional experience, industry contacts, and referrals while still in school. Opportunities in post-production, motion picture production, advertising, television, animation, motion graphics and interactive media. Admission to the program requires consent of internship course instructor. Current work experience plus classroom time is required. Supervisor evaluation will contribute to the final grade.
    • DC 380 Project Bluelight
      Production of a feature-length digital motion picture written by students or faculty within the Digital Cinema program.
    • GD 380 Design for Client and Community
      This course enables students to work from start to finish on client-based graphic design and projects. Students establish working relationships as individuals and in teams that utilize their skills to effectively evaluate the communication needs of an organization or business, develop design solutions that fulfill those needs, and negotiate the process between designers and clients.
    • IT 300 Research Experience
      This course involves the exploration of a research topic under the supervision of a research advisor.
    • IT 398 Topics in Global Information Technology
      This course focuses on current topics in the information and communications technologies that together support the "networked world." Sample topics are global software development and deployment, global data and information management, and cross-cultural project management for information systems.
    • GPH 360 Modeling Spaces
      The digital design and modeling of environmental spaces with attention to human use parameters.
  • Scientific Inquiry: Elective
    • CSC 235 Problem Solving
      How do you solve a problem? In this course we discuss different problem solving techniques and strategies such as modeling, establishing subgoals, and searching and pruning.
    • CSC 200 Survey of Computing
      Learn about careers using computers and pick up some skills to help you manage your own PC or network.
    • CSC 210 Programming with Pl/I
      A brief history of computers and an introduction to programming.
    • CSC 211 Programming in Java I
    • CSC 212 Programming in Java II
      Two courses in programming JAVA, a cross-platform, web-enabled language.
    • CSC 261 Programming in C++ I
    • CSC 262 Programming in C++ II
      Two courses in programming C++
    • CSC 233 Codes and Ciphers
      A history of code making and breaking and the math and (computer) science behind it.
    • ECT 250 Internet, Commerce, and Society
      Ever shop online? Learn the basics behind how these kinds of web sites function.
    • IT 130 The Internet and the Web
      Learn to design your own web site
    • IT 236 User Interface Development
    • IT 240 Introduction to Desktop Databases
      Learn introductory concepts in constructing databases and networking files.
    • IT 263 Applied Networks and Security Learn about how to set up and secure a home notework.
    • TDC 261 Basic Communication Systems
      Learn about how networks work and how they impact your daily life.
  • Scientific Inquiry: Lab/Quantitative
    • GPH 259 Design Geometry
      Learn the basics of Computer Aided Design.
    • DC 274 Image, Optics and Cinematic Motion
      Learn the basic physics, and photochemistry that underlies cinematography
  • Scientific Inquiry: Quantitative
    • CSC 239 Personal Computing
      You will learn how to use Excel to analyze data and how to publish data and retrieve it from the World Wide Web.
    • IT 223 Data Analysis
    • CSC 250 Computers and Human Intelligence
      Study how computers are designed to think like people.
    • HCI 201 Multimedia and the World Wide Web
      Overview of the Web, its origins and capabilities. Create your own sample web page.
  • Self, Society, and the Modern World
    • DC 105 Digital Media Literacies
      This course is designed to help students develop an informed, critical and practical understanding of new communication media, including ways to read, write and produce in a digital environment.
    • DC 235 Adaptation: the Cinematic Recrafting of Meaning
      This course explores contemporary cinematic adaptations of literature and how recent re-workings in film open viewers up to critical analysis of the cultural practices surrounding the promotion and reception of these narratives.
    • IM 208 Virtual Worlds and Online Communities
      Environments such as social networking sites, multiplayer online games and other online communities are becoming an increasingly large part of how we work, play, and learn. This course introduces the fundamentals for the interdisciplinary study of cyberculture and online social behavior. By examining core scholarship in this area, together with analyzing an existing virtual world, game, or online community, students will learn to research and understand new technologically-enabled social forms as they are emerging.
    • GAM 208 Virtual Worlds and Online Communities
      Environments such as social networking sites, multiplayer online games and other online communities are becoming an increasingly large part of how we work, play, and learn. This course introduces the fundamentals for the interdisciplinary study of cyberculture and online social behavior. By examining core scholarship in this area, together with analyzing an existing virtual world, game, or online community, students will learn to research and understand new technologically-enabled social forms as they are emerging.
    • IT 201 Introduction to Information Systems
      This course examines how various types of computer-based information systems form a critical part of modern organizations, how they work, and how they impact workers, organizations and the economy.
    • IS 208 Information Technology, Economy and Society
      This course broadly surveys the history of IT applications and information systems from the historical perspective, and critically assesses the digital impact on industry, the economy, workers, citizens, social class and the future.
    • CSC 223 The Impact of Computing Technology On Our Lives
      This course will introduce students to an overview of social analysis techniques and the theories of social change.
  • Understanding the Past: Intercontinental/Comparative
    • GAM 206 History of Games
      This class will examine particular games and game genres in their historical context using a case study format.
    • GPH 205 Historical Foundations of Visual Technology
      This course is a survey of the development, application and meaning of visual technologies in a wide range of world cultures from pre-history to the present.
  • Philosophical Inquiry
    • CSC 208 Ethics in Technology
      This course will research the impact technology has had in various areas of our lives, the new responsibilities technology presents, and our ability to deal with these changes in an ethical manner.
    • DC 227 Film Philosophy
      This course is a seminar on the philosophical analysis of film art focusing on aesthetic problems such as appearance and reality, literacy and visual effects, communication and alienation.
    • DC 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema
    • GAM 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema
    • IT 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema
      These three courses focus on the impact of computer games, movies and other digital entertainment on an individual and society.

Liberal Studies Courses Offered by CDM - Grouped by Topic

  • The Internet and How It Works
    • HCI 201 Multimedia and the World Wide Web
      Overview of the Web, its origins and capabilities. Create your own sample web page.
    • ECT 250 Internet, Commerce, and Society
      Ever shop at Gap.com? Learn the basic behind how these kinds of web sites function.
    • IT 130 The Internet and the Web
      Learn to Design Your Own Website.
    • IT 263 Applied Networks and Security
      Programming and Basic Computer "Know-How".
    • CSC 200 Survey of Computing
      Learn about Careers using computers and pick up some skills to help you manage your own PC or network!
    • CSC 210 Programming with Pl/I
      A brief history of computers and an introduction to programming
    • CSC 211 Programming in Java I
    • CSC 212 Programming in Java II
      Two courses in programming JAVA, a cross-platform, web-enabled language.
    • CSC 261 Programming in C++ I
    • CSC 262 Programming in C++ II
      Two courses in programming C++.
    • TDC 261 Basic Communication Systems
  • The Computer and Society
    • IT 201 Introduction to Information Systems
      This course examines how various types of computer-based information systems form a critical part of modern organizations, how they work, and how they impact workers, organizations and the economy.
    • IS 208 Information Technology, Economy and Society
      This course broadly surveys the history of IT applications and information systems from the historical perspective, and critically assesses the digital impact on industry, the economy, workers, citizens, social class and the future.
    • CSC 223 The Impact of Computing Technology On Our Lives
      This course will introduce students to an overview of social analysis techniques and the theories of social change.
    • CSC 208 Ethics in Technology
      This course will research the impact technology has had in various areas of our lives, the new responsibilities technology presents, and our ability to deal with these changes in an ethical manner.
    • DC 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema
    • GAM 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema
    • IT 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema These courses focus on the impact of computer games, movies and other digital entertainment on an individual and society.
    • IM 208 Virtual Worlds and Online Communities
      Environments such as social networking sites, multiplayer online games and other online communities are becoming an increasingly large part of how we work, play, and learn. This course introduces the fundamentals for the interdisciplinary study of cyberculture and online social behavior. By examining core scholarship in this area, together with analyzing an existing virtual world, game, or online community, students will learn to research and understand new technologically-enabled social forms as they are emerging.
    • GAM 208 Virtual Worlds and Online Communities
      Environments such as social networking sites, multiplayer online games and other online communities are becoming an increasingly large part of how we work, play, and learn. This course introduces the fundamentals for the interdisciplinary study of cyberculture and online social behavior. By examining core scholarship in this area, together with analyzing an existing virtual world, game, or online community, students will learn to research and understand new technologically-enabled social forms as they are emerging.
  • Computer Graphics and Motion Technology
    • GD 200 Graphic Design I
      This course introduces the world of graphic design in a social and historical context. The goals are to explore formal structures and research methods with emphasis on the role of analysis and conceptual thinking as the first tasks of the print and multi-media designer. The course includes basic instruction in typography, color, problem-solving in print and on screen.
    • GD 210 Digital Illustration I
      Introduction to illustration development in image, line and photography, combining computer applications and hand-rendered approaches.
    • GD 220 History of Design I
      The history of graphic design is an evolution in aesthetics, technology, style and visual communication. The class will encompass a survey of the major movements in the field of print design, notable designers and design materials. The nature of changing methods, materials, technologies and values are examined in the context of the social and political realities that shape communication. The course will include the historical shift from print to multimedia design methodologies.
    • GD 380 Design for Client and Community
      This course enables students to work from start to finish on client-based graphic design and projects. Students establish working relationships as individuals and in teams that utilize their skills to effectively evaluate the communication needs of an organization or business, develop design solutions that fulfill those needs, and negotiate the process between designers and clients.
    • GPH 205 Historical Foundations of Visual Technology
      This course is a survey of the development, application and meaning of visual technologies in a wide range of world cultures from pre-history to the present.
    • GPH 211 Perceptual Principles for Digital Environments I
    • GPH 212 Perceptual Principles for Digital Environments II
    • GPH 213 Perceptual Principles for Digital Environments III
      These three foundational courses in computer animation take you through the process of creating 2-D and 3-D representations on the computer. The last course teaches you how to animate them.
    • GPH 259 Design Geometry
      Learn the basics of Computer Aided Design.
    • GPH 360 Modeling Spaces
      The digital design and modeling of environmental spaces with attention to human use parameters.
    • ANI 101 Animation for Non-Majors
      Course introduces a variety of basic animation techniques for cinema and gaming, such as hand-drawn, cutout, stop-motion and (very basic) 3D, with an emphasis on the use of computer technology.
    • ANI 206 History of Animation
      History of Animation: This course is an introduction to the history and development of the field of animation.
  • Data Analysis and Retrieval
    • CSC 235 Problem Solving
      How do you solve a problem? In this course we discuss different problem solving techniques and strategies such as modeling, establishing subgoals, and searching and pruning
    • CSC 239 Personal Computing
      You will learn how to use Excel to analyze data and how to publish data and retrieve it from the World Wide Web.
    • IT 223 Data Analysis
    • IT 240 Introduction to Desktop Databases
      Programmers: Scientific Inquiry: Elective
      Learn introductory concepts in constructing databases and networking files.
      Design your own web site.
    • HCI 201 Multimedia and the World Wide Web
      Overview of the Web, its origins and capabilities. Create your own sample web page.
    • ECT 250 Internet, Commerce, and Society
      Ever shop at Gap.com? Learn the basic behind how these kinds of web sites function.
    • IT 130 The Internet and the Web
      Learn to design your own complex web site
  • Codes, Ciphers and Computer Intelligence
    • CSC 250 Computers and Human Intelligence
      Study how computers are designed to think like people.
    • CSC 233 Codes and Ciphers
      A history of code making and breaking and the math and (computer) science behind it.
  • Digital Cinema and Gaming
    • DC 105 Digital Media Literacies
      This course is designed to help students develop an informed, critical and practical understanding of new communication media, including ways to read, write and produce in a digital environment.
    • DC 206 History of Cinema Production
      This course studies the origins and rise of film as an art form, an industry, a set of technological practices, and cultural documents. The course examine critical historical events that impacted the industry; the emergence of the studio system, the coming of sound, the U.S. depression, the world wars, audience shifts, emergence of other communication media. We also examine various world film industries in order to understand the relationships existing among national media producers.
    • DC 207 History of Cinema I, 1890-1945
      This course examines the history of cinema as one of the most influential cultural forms of the 20th Century. We will study the aesthetic and technological developments of cinema during its first 50 years, as well as examine the social and economic factors shaping its history. Initially influenced by other art forms (theater, literature, painting) filmmaking quickly acquired its own formal system, language, and traditions. We will trace the changing styles, techniques, content, and methods of filmmaking as an art form, as popular culture, and as an industry. We will consider how cinema is bound to its social context via audience relations, economics, technology, and ideology. The limited scope of this course will cover primarily feature-length, narratives films as the dominant mode of filmmaking, although we will also look at the development of documentary and experimental filmmaking. The class will consist of lectures, screenings, and discussions.
    • DC 208 History of American Cinema, 1946-1975
      From Film Noir to Hitchcock, an examination of post war Hollywood, film noir, wide screen and epic films, the development of the star system, the director as auteur, and the influence of international film movements and directors. Screenings, lecture, and discussion.
    • DC 209 History of Cinema III, 1975-Present
      This final course in the film history sequence is designed to introduce students to a sense of modern film history and the multiple permutations of cinema around the modern film history and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. It presents film history from a global perspective, concentrating primarily on the development of new national and transnational cinemas. The course continues to chart the development of the American studios since the mid-1970s while examining the effects of media consolidation and convergence. Moreover, the course seeks to examine how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood filmmaking on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form of communication in the 21st century.
    • DC 113 Audio for Podcasts and Other Media
      This course is an introduction to the uses and practical applications of sound for multimedia. Students will study various uses of sound and music on the Internet from creative to professional websites. Using free or inexpensive hardware and software, students will learn to create and edit podcasts and attach audio files to programs and web pages such as Facebook, Itunes, Keynote, PowerPoint and other sites. The course will cover both Mac and PC applications so all students will be able to work on projects from their home computers. The course will also cover current legalities of digital media.
    • DC 120 Video Editing
      Students analyze and assemble dramatic scenes under a variety of conditions and narrative strategies. Editing theories, techniques and procedures, issues of continuity, effects, movement and sound are examined as they relate to the fundamentals of cinematic montage and visual storytelling. This class presents a variety of topics and experiences that are designed to broaden the student's understanding of the art of cinematic storytelling and montage. Work on more advanced projects is integrated into the class as a means to an understanding of advanced editing tools and techniques.
    • DC 125 Digital Still Photography for Non-Majors
      This course is an introduction to the history and aesthetics of still photography and to the concept of photography as a descriptive and interpretive artistic medium. Students studying photographs in this context will discover relationships between individual photographers choices and their own understanding of meaning. Students will learn the fundamental concepts necessary to shoot, edit, manipulate, and print digital still photographs.
    • GAM 206 History of Games
      This class will examine particular games and game genres in their historical context using a case study format.
    • DC 201 Introduction to Screenwriting
      This course focuses on narrative storytelling and encourages students to find their unique voices, while emphasizing the critical importance of working as part of a creative team.
    • DC 202 History of Motion Picture Editing
      This course studies the origins and rise of film editing as an art form, an industry, a set of technological practices ranging from analog film to digital video. The course examines critical historical events that impacted film editing, the emergence of the studio system, the coming of sound, narrative, experimental and documentary film, MTV, and audience shifts. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this question.
    • DC 205 Foundations of Cinema
      Acquisition and computer representation of sound and image. Sound and video standards. Lossy and Lossless compression. Basic computer graphics and rendering. Distribution of digital information.
    • DC 222 Classic Hollywood Film Structure
      This course focuses on the critical analysis of narrative structure in Cinema. Students will learn how to identify key story concepts and break down three act structure in finished films and scripts.
    • DC 233 Cinema and Art
      This course will provide an overview of avant-garde film, video, animation and installation, and the relationship of these cinematic forms to Modern and Contemporary art.
    • DC 227 Film Philosophy
      This course is a seminar on the philosophical analysis of film art focusing on aesthetic problems such as appearance and reality, literacy and visual effects, communication and alienation.
    • DC 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema
    • GAM 228 Ethics in Computer Games and Cinema These courses focus on the impact of computer games, movies and other digital entertainment on an individual and society.
    • DC 235 Adaptation: the Cinematic Recrafting of Meaning
      This course explores contemporary cinematic adaptations of literature and how recent re-workings in film open viewers up to critical analysis of the cultural practices surrounding the promotion and reception of these narratives.
    • DC 250 The Art of Screen Acting
      This course is an introduction and examination of the collaborative process between the actor and director. Methods of study include lecture, discussion, assignments, and in-class acting exercises.
    • DC 274 Image, Optics and Cinematic Motion
      Learn the basic physics, and photochemistry that underlies cinematography
    • GAM 224 Game Design for Non-Majors
      Students will learn about a game's "hook", its "high concept" and the crucial needs of marketing for a successful game design. Students will also learn to design a game's component pieces.
    • ANI 101 Animation for Non-Majors
      Course introduces a variety of basic animation techniques for cinema and gaming, such as hand-drawn, cutout, stop-motion and (very basic) 3D, with an emphasis on the use of computer technology.
    • ANI 206 History of Animation
      History of Animation: This course is an introduction to the history and development of the field of animation.

Restrictions for CDM students

A CDM student can take any CDM course approved for liberal studies credit and use it to satisfy a domain of the liberal studies program (LSP) provided the course is NOT required as part of the student's major.

A CDM student can not count a course as a liberal studies requirement and a major requirement. No double counting is allowed for CDM classes by CDM students.

Example 1

  • A CGMT student cannot use GPH 211 to satisfy the arts and literature requirement of LSP, as GPH 211 is required by all CGMT tracks.
  • An ECT major CAN take GPH 211 to satisfy the arts and literature requirement of the LSP. The course qualifies for a liberal studies program domain that is required by the student's major.

Example 2

  • A CS student CAN take GPH 259 to satisfy the Scientific Inquiry (SI)-Quantitative-Lab requirement of LSP because the course is not required by the CS major AND it counts for SI-Lab which is a required domain for CS students.
  • A CS student CANNOT take CSC 250 to satisfy SI because, although the course is not required by any of our programs, it qualifies for SI-quantitative (not Lab) which is NOT a required domain for CDM students.

Example 3

  • A CS student takes GPH 211 for arts and literature LSP. Although GPH 211 is allowed as an elective even if it is not a 300 level course, the student CANNOT count the course both as satisfying an LSP domain AND as an elective for the CS program.