Liberal Studies Courses

Liberal Studies Courses

CDM offers dozens of courses in many domains of the Liberal Studies Program (LSP). You can experiment with Screenwriting, Digital Photography, Game Design, Computer Graphics, and Programming and fulfill a requirement at the same time. Many of these courses also serve as gateway courses into more advanced CDM courses. Courses offered in the student's primary major cannot be taken to fulfill LSP Domain requirements.


Liberal Studies Courses Offered by CDM

This list represents LSP courses taught by CDM only.

For a complete list of LSP courses, visit the Liberal Studies homepage.

Course Legend 
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  • First Year Program
    • LSP 121
      This course provides more advanced mathematical and computational methods in the analysis and interpretation of quantitative information. Topics include databases, descriptive statistics, measures of association and their interpretation, elementary probability theory, and an introduction to algorithms and computer programming. The course is taught in a hands-on laboratory environment where students are introduced to advanced computer tools for data analysis, including databases and a professional statistical software package. PREREQUISITE(S): LSP 120 or a passing score on the LSP 120 Proficiency Exam. As an alternative to taking LSP 121, this requirement can be met by passing a separate LSP 121 Proficiency Exam (see qrc.depaul.edu). A student whose major requires calculus is exempt from this requirement. Formerly ISP 121.
  • Arts and Literature
    • ANI 101
      Course introduces a variety of basic animation techniques for cinema and gaming, such as hand-drawn, cutout, stop-motion and (very basic) 3D, with an emphasis on the use of computer technology. Examples of diverse animation genres and styles (experimental, cartoon, anime, special effects, computer games) from different cultures will be screened and discussed. Students will explore the unique qualities of the medium through a series of hands-on projects that can be adapted to their own personal interests. They will learn about professional animation process (storyboard and animatic) during the production of a final project that encourages them to consider the role and potential of animation in our society.
    • ANI 206
      This course is an introduction to the history and development of the field of animation. We will explore this subject from various perspectives: by chronology, from its prehistory before the invention of film to the present day; by form, including method and medium; by culture, comparing the US to Japan, Russia, Europe and others; by subject; and by personality, concentrating on the figures who have shaped the art form and continue to influence it through their example. Students are expected to bring an enthusiastic interest in the medium, and to devote serious effort to reading about, viewing, researching and discussing animation and the artists who have created it.
    • DC 100
      This lecture-based course will introduce students to the art of cinema from the point of view of the filmmaker. Through screenings of contemporary and classic films, students will gain an appreciation of the various crafts involved in the making of movies, such as: acting, directing, producing, screenwriting, cinematography, production design, editing, sound, or visual effects.
    • DC 113
      This course is an introduction to the uses and practical applications of sound for multimedia. Students will study various uses of sound and music on the Internet from creative to professional websites. Using free or inexpensive hardware and software, students will learn to create and edit podcasts and attach audio files to programs and web pages such as Facebook, iTunes, Keynote, PowerPoint and other sites. The course will cover both Mac and PC applications so all students will be able to work on projects from their home computers. The course will also cover current legalities of digital media. PREREQUISITES: NONE
    • DC 120
      Students analyze and assemble dramatic scenes under a variety of conditions and narrative strategies. Editing theories, techniques and procedures, issues of continuity, effects, movement and sound are examined as they relate to the fundamentals of cinematic montage and visual storytelling. This class presents a variety of topics and experiences that are designed to broaden the student's understanding of the art of cinematic storytelling and montage. Work on more advanced projects is integrated into the class as a means to an understanding of advanced editing tools and techniques. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE
    • DC 121
      This course explores production design and art direction as a narrative art form in cinema and examines the collaborative relationship between director, production designer and cinematographer. Using films, observational readings, screenplays, lectures, research, and discussion, students will study the fundamentals of a production designer's approach towards visualizing and conceptualizing story. Students will also gain a historical perspective of how the role of production design has evolved and how advances in technology have influenced the various crafts.
    • DC 125
      This course is an introduction to the history and aesthetics of still photography and to the concept of photography as a descriptive and interpretive artistic medium. Students studying photographs in this context will discover relationships between individual photographers' choices and their own understanding of meaning. Discussions of the photos' cultural contexts and meanings will deepen their understanding of the role of still photography as a conduit for cultural values. Students will learn the fundamental concepts necessary to shoot, edit, manipulate, and print digital still photographs. Also, students will acquire the knowledge needed to analyze and critique existing work. Students will be required to use their own digital still cameras for this course.
    • DC 201
      This course is an introduction to and overview of the elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema. Emphasis is placed on telling a story in terms of action and the reality of characters. The difference between the literary and visual medium is explored through individual writing projects and group analysis. Development of synopsis and treatment for a short theatrical screen play: theme, plot, character, mise-en-scene and utilization of cinematic elements. PREREQUISITE(S): None.
    • DC 202
      This course studies the origins and rise of film editing as an art form, an industry, a set of technological practices ranging from analog film to digital video. The course examines critical historical events that impacted film editing: the emergence of the studio system, the coming of sound, narrative, experimental and documentary film, MTV, and audience shifts. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this question. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE
    • DC 205
      This course will examine the craft, technology, and aesthetic principles of media production. Drawing heavily on a wide array of historical examples, the course will examine the many expressive strategies potentially usable in the creation of moving image art forms: the importance of story and controlling ideas, storytelling with images, the basics of composition and editing, and an examination of narrative, documentary, and experimental approaches. In addition to analyzing the works of others, students will also produce their own projects thus, putting theory into practice.
    • DC 222
      Critical analysis of successful Hollywood films and their narrative structures. Films of various genres and eras will be examined. Students will learn how to recognize classical three-act structure in finished films and scripts. Students will develop a cinematic language with which to discuss films as well as a toolbox of techniques to use when making films. Key story concepts to be discussed include: protagonist, antagonist, want versus need, elements of the future, poetic justice, planting and payoff, catalyst, climax, and Aristotelian terminology. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE
    • DC 224
      This analytical course examines the screenplay's evolution to the screen from a writer's perspective. Students will read feature length scripts of varying genres and then perform a critical analysis and comparison of the text to the final produced versions of the films. Storytelling conventions such as structure, character development, theme, and the creation of tension will be used to uncover alterations and how these adjustments ultimately impacted the film's reception.
    • DC 229
      Students will analyze and discuss some of the most important and influential shows in television history. Students will learn all about the writer-centric form of scripted television, where it's been and where it's heading. Students study serials and procedurals, network and cable shows, principal leads, partnerships and ensembles, comedy and drama, prevalent themes, innovations in content and form, the impact of DVR, and the impact of the internet.
    • DC 233
      This course will provide an overview of avant-garde film, video, animation and installation, and the relationship of these cinematic forms to Modern and Contemporary art. Students will be introduced to the major styles and themes of alternative and experimental moving image work from the past hundred years. Cinema & Art places emphasis on moving image work that is not usually included in a survey of mainstream cinema or film history. A major concern for the class is first-hand exposure to these original sources, and an examination of the relationship of these works to mainstream cinema and other types of popular culture. Topics covered in the class include the avant-garde and kitsch, Surrealism, experimental film, abstract animation, video art, camp, and video installation. In addition to lectures by visiting artists and viewing films, videos, and installation work, students will produce a short creative work in the style of their choice that responds to the work studied during the quarter.
    • DC 250
      This course will examine the role of acting, actors, and actor-director collaboration in the development of narrative cinema. The screen demanded a new approach to acting which differed markedly from the theatrical traditions which proceeded it. Seminal practitioners of actor training such as Constantin Stanislavski and his American interpreters Lee Strasberg, Sanford Meisner, and Stella Adler and their students (such as Brando, Pacino, DeNiro, Hoffman, and Duvall) have had an incalculable influence on how screen actors prepare for a role and work with directors. This course will survey the major acting techniques and approaches, examine major films as case studies, and explore contemporary approaches to screen acting and actor-director collaboration in the cinema.
    • GAM 224
      This course approaches the study of computer games from three angles: first, as examples of media that can be analyzed and critiqued for their thematic elements, formal structure, plot and interactive appreciation; second, as complex software artifacts subject to technological constraints and the product of a labor-intensive design and implementation process; and three as a cultural artifact with behaviors and associations comparable in import to other popular art forms. Students will study the principles of game design and use them both to analyze existing games and to develop their own original game ideas. Students will also learn about the process of game development, starting from the game's narrative concept and moving to consideration of a game's components: the representation of the player, of artifacts, the virtual world that contains them and the interaction between them and the player.
    • GD 200
      This course introduces the world of graphic design in a social and historical context. The goals are to explore formal structures and research methods with emphasis on the role of analysis and conceptual thinking as the first tasks of the print and multi-media designer. The course includes basic instruction in typography, color, problem-solving in print and on screen. PREREQUISITE(S): GD 105, ART 105, ANI 105 or GPH 211.
    • GD 220
      The history of graphic design is an evolution in aesthetics, technology, style and visual communication. The class will encompass a survey of the major movements in the field of print design, notable designers and design materials. The nature of changing methods, materials, technologies and values are examined in the context of the social and political realities that shape communication. The course will include the historical shift from print to multimedia design methodologies.
    • GD 221
      World movements in design and contemporary practice in print, web and experiential design. GD 220 is recommended as preparation for this class.
    • GPH 211
      An introduction to the visual, non-verbal principles incorporated in the effective presentation of on-screen environments. This course emphasizes the use of two-dimensional elements and their organization.
    • GPH 212
      Further experience with the visual, non-verbal principles incorporated in effective presentation of on-screen environments. This course emphasizes the use of three-dimensional elements, spaces and their organization. PREREQUISITE(S): ART 105, GD 105, GPH 211 or HCI 402.
    • GPH 213
      An introduction to the visual and communication principles for the structure and organization of time-based digital environments. Introduction to standard 2D animation software applications. PREREQUISITE(S): GPH 211 or GD 105 or equivalent
    • ILL 206
      This course will cover the history of the art form collectively known as "comics" --mechanically reproduced graphic storytelling--which includes comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, Japanese manga and online comics. Students will be introduced to the evolution of the art form from 18th century precursors, to late 19th century newspaper pages, to the 20th century comic book, through today's sophisticated graphic novels. The course will devote considerable time to comics of other cultures, with special emphasis on Japan and Europe. It will also examine the relationship of comics to culture at large, and the struggle of underground and alternative comic artists to explore adult subjects such as politics and gender.
  • Experiential Learning
    • ANI 380
      Production of an animated digital motion picture written by students or faculty within the School of Cinematic Arts. Students will work as crew under supervision of faculty members heading each of the various production areas. The goal is to work towards a completed animated digital motion picture suitable for festivals or distribution.
    • CSC 298
      This course satisfies the junior year experiential learning requirement. In cooperation with local employers, this course offers students the opportunity to integrate their academic experience with on-the-job training in computer related work areas. Admission to the program requires consent of internship course instructor. Current work experience plus classroom time is required. Supervisor evaluation will contribute to the final grade.
    • CSC 379
      Students in this course will have the opportunity to assess urban community needs in the technology arena and develop skills in assisting and developing methods for "bridging the digital divide" that exists. As a result, the student will be able to make a substantial difference in an underprivileged academic community group. This course is a CDM-sponsored community-based service learning course. Any student enrolled in this course can also satisfy the junior year experiential learning requirement.
    • DC 298
      This course offers students the opportunity to reflect on an internship while gaining professional experience, industry contact, and referrals while still in school. The class fulfills the Junior Year Experiential Learning credit and must be taken concurrently with an approved internship. Opportunities in post-production, motion picture production, advertising, television, animation, game design, graphic design, motion graphics and interactive media can qualify for the course. Classroom time is required. Admission to the program requires consent of internship course instructor after the verification of the student's internship. Prerequisites: Internship
    • DC 380
      Production of a feature-length digital motion picture written by students or faculty within the Digital Cinema program. Students will work as crew under supervision of faculty members heading each of the various production areas. Goal is to produce a completed digital motion picture suitable for festivals or distribution.
    • DC 396
      This practical course offers students an intensive experience studying cinema and/or television production abroad. Students will be introduced to the cultural context, practices, philosophies, styles and business of film and TV. Facility tours, screenings and cultural experiences may be used to supplement the classroom activities in order to deepen the understanding of the experience abroad. PREREQUISITE(S): None
    • GD 380
      This course enables students to work from start to finish on client-based graphic design and projects. Students establish working relationships as individuals and in teams that utilize their skills to effectively evaluate the communication needs of an organization or business, develop design solutions that fulfill those needs, and negotiate the process between designers and clients. Objectives of the course include: improving student's developing design skills to an advanced level, creating awareness of current design trends, supporting student's development of independent working habits, utilizing integration of both hand-skills and the computer as design tools, and completing professional projects after staged client feedback and revisions. PREREQUISITE(S): GD 200 and GD 230
    • GPH 360
      The digital design and modeling of environmental spaces with attention to human use parameters. PREREQUISITE(S): GPH 250.
    • IT 300
      This course involves the exploration of a research topic under the supervision of a research advisor. PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of dean. (variable credit)
    • IT 394
      This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence (winter/spring) for CDM students that satisfies both the Senior Year Capstone requirement and the Junior Year Experiential Learning requirement. The second quarter will be IT 395. You will earn four quarter hours of credit for each quarter for a total of eight quarter hours of credit. You must complete both quarters to receive any credit. We work with a community service organization, chosen with help of the Steans Center for Community-based Service Learning. As a community-based service learning course, students will have the opportunity to assess urban community needs in technology, and use problem-solving methods and strategies to make a substantial difference in an inner-city community group, usually by developing an application or a web site. PREREQUISITE(S): IT 320 or CSC 355 or CSC 360
    • IT 398
      This course focuses on current topics in the information and communications technologies that together support the "networked world." Sample topics are global software development and deployment, global data and information management, and cross-cultural project management for information systems. The course may be offered for variable credit hours (2, 4, 8, 16, and 32). (variable credit)
  • Philosophical Inquiry
    • CSC 208
      Information Technology and the rapid pace in which it has advanced have had a tremendous impact on our lives. Changes have been swift and the human capacity to deal with them is limited. It has been said that our technology has outpaced our humanity. This course will research the new responsibilities technology presents and our ability to deal with these changes in an ethical manner. Students will employ ethical frameworks, which integrate computer science and ethics, to develop the skills required to examine different sets of assumptions and question them. Case studies will provide a historical perspective for analysis.
    • DC 227
      An introduction to philosophy, using film as a lens through which philosophical ideas are examined. In discussion and writing, students analyze narrative or documentary films (classic or contemporary) on enduring philosophical questions such as: what is truth; what is right; or what is the meaning of life.
    • DC 228
      Societies function based on normative ethics utilizing common sense to distinguish between ethical and unethical behavior. Most of us are not aware of the underlying theories when arriving at ethical judgments about right and wrong. However, the fast pace of progress in information technologies and digital entertainment creates an environment, in which ethical challenges are particularly complex. In the eyes of many, games and movies are violent, offensive and immoral. This course will concentrate on analyzing the impact of digital entertainment on an individual and society. Implications of certain values embedded in games and movies will be discussed. Elements of the ethical code of conduct for a game or movie creator will be formulated. The issue of balancing individual creativity vs. cultural impact particularly on children will be discussed.
    • GAM 228
      Societies function based on normative ethics utilizing common sense to distinguish between ethical and unethical behavior. Most of us are not aware of the underlying theories when arriving at ethical judgments about right and wrong. However, the fast pace of progress in information technologies and digital entertainment creates an environment in which ethical challenges are particularly complex. In the eyes of many, games and movies are violent, offensive and immoral. This course will concentrate on analyzing the impact of digital entertainment on an individual and society. Implications of certain values embedded in games and movies will be discussed. Elements of the ethical code of conduct for a game or movie creator will be formulated. The issue of balancing individual creativity vs. cultural impact, particularly on children, will be discussed.
    • IT 228
      Societies function based on normative ethics utilizing common sense to distinguish between ethical and unethical behavior. Most of us are not aware of the underlying theories when arriving at ethical judgments about right and wrong. However, the fast pace of progress in information technologies and digital entertainment creates an environment in which ethical challenges are particularly complex. In the eyes of many, games and movies are violent, offensive and immoral. This course will concentrate on analyzing the impact of digital entertainment on an individual and society. Implications of certain values embedded in games and movies will be discussed. Elements of the ethical code of conduct for a game or movie creator will be formulated. The issue of balancing individual creativity vs. cultural impact particularly on children will be discussed.
  • Scientific Inquiry: Non-lab
    • CSC 200
      This introductory course explores various careers in the field of information technology. A hands-on component will deal with state of the art personal computer operating systems, applications, database systems, Internet, email, and basic website construction. The structure of the course utilizes both classroom lectures and computer classroom labs. This course is geared toward the non-major and assumes no prior knowledge or experience in Computer Science.
    • CSC 233
      This course is an introduction to the science and history of secret writing (cryptography) and how codes and ciphers can be broken (cryptanalysis). In historical settings we will encounter the main ideas and methods devised to secure communication channels. Possible topics include: substitution ciphers, transposition ciphers, the Vigenere cipher, statistical methods in cryptanalysis, public-key cryptography, and quantum cryptography. PREREQUISTE: LSP 120 or MAT 130 or CSC 241
    • CSC 235
      How do you solve a problem? In this course we discuss different problem solving techniques and strategies such as modeling, establishing subgoals, and searching and pruning. The techniques will be presented as part of a theoretical framework, but there will be significant emphasis on solving problems in familiar domains such as games, newspaper articles, philosophy, and simple geometry and logic. At the end of the course, students will have built a repertoire of problem solving tools that will allow them to make an informed choice of approach towards new problems.
    • CSC 250
      Students taking this course will study human problem-solving and its simulation by computers. Artificial intelligence, pattern recognition and learning programs will be discussed. PREREQUISITE(S): Familiarity with basic computer productivity tools and the Web.
    • CSC 270
      This course explores complex systems both natural and man-made, characterized by the relationships between interacting entities. Network structures can be found in the Internet and its many applications, but also in social relationships, marketplaces, ecosystems, even cells. We will examine a wide range of networks including technological, social, and natural. Students will learn basic concepts from graph theory, algorithms and network analysis, apply tools for extracting, analyzing and visualizing network properties, using data sets drawn from a variety of areas. PREREQUISITE(S): LSP 120
    • ECT 250
      An introduction of Internet technology, its application for commerce, and its social impact. This course surveys Internet technology, collaboration and commerce activities, digital media distribution, online communities, and social networking in the Internet environment.
    • HCI 201
      An introduction to the World Wide Web and web development for non-technical majors. Students will create web pages using a WYSIWYG editor. Students will evaluate web sites using a variety of analytical and empirical methods. Students will conduct technology-related experiments following the principles of the scientific method and use technology to analyze their results. Topics include web-based technology, creating content for distribution on the web, and design principles for web sites. Students will develop an appreciation for the connections among science, mathematics, and technology in modern society, as well as for the principles guiding advances in science and technology. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE.
    • IM 222
      This course discusses the basic problems and techniques of visualizing quantitative and qualitative data. Topics include: perception, types of information, representation of univariate and multivariate data and relational information, analysis of representations, presentation, and dynamic and interactive visualizations. Students will create visualizations using graphical software PREREQUISITES: LSP 120
    • ISM 222
      This course discusses the basic problems and techniques of visualizing quantitative and qualitative data. Topics include: perception, types of information, representation of univariate and multivariate data and relational information, analysis of representations, presentation, and dynamic and interactive visualizations. Students will create visualizations using graphical software. PREREQUISITES: LSP 120
    • IT 130
      An introduction to the Internet, the World Wide Web, and web development for students with a strong interest in technology. Students will create interactive web pages by writing HTML and CSS and by programming in JavaScript. Topics include the origins of the web, the roles and operations of web browsers and web servers, interacting with web applications through forms, and using style sheets to separate document structure and document formatting. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE.
    • IT 223
      (FORMERLY CSC 323) Application of statistical concepts and techniques to a variety of problems in IT areas and other disciplines, using a statistical package for simple data analysis. Course topics include descriptive statistics, elementary probability rules, sampling, distributions, confidence intervals, correlation, regression and hypothesis testing. PREREQUISITE(S): MAT 130 or placement
    • IT 236
      The focus of the course is to build interfaces to simple programs. The course will cover interface controls, event handling, and the use of built-in and/or pre-written controls. The course will cover simple database access through a Database control and possibly access to WebServices such as Google. Good visual design principles will be emphasized throughout the course. PREREQUISITE(S): IT 130
    • IT 240
      This course will introduce students to the design, implementation and use of desktop databases. Major topics include: modeling using ER diagrams, creating and maintaining a database using a PC-based application, composing and using queries in Structured Query Language, creating and customizing forms and reports, and integrating databases with other sources of data and applications. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE
    • IT 263
      This course introduces the networking and security technologies required to build and maintain a home or small-office network. Networking topics will include client/server application software configuration, network connectivity (cabling, switch and router configuration), basic IP addressing, network address translation and options for public Internet access services. Security topics will include typical threats and responses, firewalls, host hardening, password management and virtual private network (VPNs). The course has a lab component where students apply wired and wireless technologies to design and administer a small network with various applications. PREREQUISITE(S): none
    • TDC 261
      (Formerly TDC 361) Introduction to voice, data, and multi-media network communications fundamentals. Wired, Wireless, and Optical applications in Local, Metropolitan, Wide Area Networks are explored. The overview explains how technical, regulatory, competitive, standardization and cultural factors impact modern network applications. Approved for Scientific Inquiry credit. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE.
  • Scientific Inquiry: Lab
    • DC 274
      Cinematography is the scientifically grounded discipline of making lighting and camera choices in order to record moving images. This course deals with the basic mathematics, physics, and photochemistry that underlie cinematography and that motivate camera design and construction. A student who masters the foundations of cinematography through a mixture of lectures, readings, exercises, and labs will be able to evaluate and understand how motion based recording choices affect perception of moving images they see every day.
    • GPH 259
      An historical and practical introduction to the visual applications of geometry. This CAD-based survey covers constructive geometry, surface symmetry, projective geometry, polyhedrons and spheroids through the discussion of historical precedents and practicum exercises.
    • GPH 279
      This course explores ancient and early modern understanding of the cosmos and how this was successfully modeled into the sundial. About half of the course lectures are historical, while others explain the astronomy, geography and geometry used to design the dial. During lab sessions students design and create their own sundials.
  • Senior Capstone Seminar
    • ANI 395
      Continuation of ANI 394. This production-based course is the second half of a two-course sequence that provides the student with an Animation capstone experience. These courses connect the student's Animation coursework with their overall Liberal Studies coursework through three components: class lectures and discussions, independent analysis and reflection, and the creation of a significant animation project. Students will employ the knowledge they have learned and the skills they have acquired in all their Animation courses to date to produce a significant animation project. The course sequence is designed to be taken in two consecutive quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 394
    • CNS 395
      This senior project capstone course requires students to apply Information System Security Engineering methods and processes to perform the design and implementation of Information Systems Security infrastructures. The human and sociological impacts of Information Security will be studied with a particular focus on privacy issues, ethical use of Security tools and cultural and legal difference that exist in a globally connected but diverse world. PREREQUISITE(S): CNS 394
    • CSC 394
      Students will be provided with experience in team design, implementation and testing of a large software project. PREREQUISTE(S): CSC 301 or CSC 393 or ISM 360
    • DC 398
      This course provides a Digital Cinema-specific capstone experience for the student. Students must have completed at least one of the three Topics in Production courses before they enroll in this course. The capstone course will connect the students' Digital Cinema course work with the University courses s/he has taken through three components: student-generated production packages, class/instructor discussions, and the actual creation/production of the student's proposal. The production piece is the primary focus of this course. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 397 (variable credit)
    • GAM 395
      Continuation of GAM 394. PREREQUISITE(S): GAM 394
    • GD 395
      This two course sequence provides a Graphic Design-specific capstone experience for the student. The capstone course will connect the student's Graphic Design course work with the University courses s/he has taken through three components: student-generated design proposals, class/instructor discussions, and the actual creation/production of the student's proposal. The production piece is the primary focus of this course that takes place over two quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): GD 394
    • GPH 395
      A group project involving analysis, design, creation, implementation and testing of a large project such as an animation, an interactive multimedia presentation or a video game. Portfolio creation and critique. Discussion of strategies for graduate school and the job market. PREREQUISITE(S): GPH 338 or GPH 372.
    • IS 376
      This senior project course requires students to apply prior learning in project management and systems development lifecycle by developing a complete system from business case, analysis, and design, through implementation strategies. Team project, documentation, presentation, the use of development as well as project management tools will be emphasized. PREREQUISITE(S): IS 372
    • IT 395
      This is the continuation of IT 394. IT 394 and IT 395 must be taken as a sequence in two consecutive quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): IT 394
    • SE 392
      This course is a continuation of SE 391. SE 391 and SE 392 must be taken as a sequence in consecutive quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): SE 391.
    • TDC 376
      Case study in developing a large network project. Students will work in groups to analyze and design a major network system. PREREQUISITE(S): TDC 365.
  • Social, Cultural and Behaviorial Inquiry
    • CSC 223
      This course will introduce students to an overview of social analysis techniques and the theories of social change. These tools will be used to explore social impact issues of computing technology. Counts for Liberal Studies SCBI credit.
    • DC 105
      This course is designed to help students develop an informed, critical and practical understanding of new communication media, including ways to read, write and produce in a digital environment. We will explore implications of these technologies and their uses in schools, communities, and workplaces. The course also focuses on practices involving current and future technologies that hold promise for the creation and distribution of all media.
    • DC 235
      This course explores contemporary cinematic adaptations of literature and how recent re-workings in film open viewers up to critical analysis of the cultural practices surrounding the promotion and reception of these narratives. What issues have an impact upon the borrowing and reinterpreting of narratives of film? How, when, and where can we identify such borrowings and reinterpretations in multiple contemporary iterations of the same narrative? PREREQUISITE(S): NONE
    • GAM 200
      Exploring the concept of "play" from a variety of disciplinary perspectives including sociology, anthropology, psychology, literary and theater studies and the arts, this course discusses "play" as a central force in cultural, social, artistic and personal development. It intends to raise awareness for the ways in which "play" can promote creativity, mental and emotional health, problem solving as well as personal and social change. It analyzes the role of "play" as an element of negotiation and reconciliation between disparate forces within the individual and with others.
    • GAM 208
      Environments such as social networking sites, multiplayer online games and other online communities are becoming an increasingly large part of how we work, play, and learn. This course introduces the fundamentals for the interdisciplinary study of cyberculture and online social behavior. By examining core scholarship in this area, together with analyzing an existing virtual world, game, or online community, students will learn to research and understand new technologically-enabled social forms as they are emerging. PREREQUISITE(S) WRD 104
    • IM 208
      Environments such as social networking sites, multiplayer online games and other online communities are becoming an increasingly large part of how we work, play, and learn. This course introduces the fundamentals for the interdisciplinary study of cyberculture and online social behavior. By examining core scholarship in this area, together with analyzing an existing virtual world, game, or online community, students will learn to research and understand new technologically-enabled social forms as they are emerging. PREREQUISITE(S) WRD 104
    • IS 201
      This course demonstrates how information is used by organizations to conduct business and solve problems. This course presents information systems principles and demonstrates how they form an integral part of modern organizations. Topics include systems concepts; organizational processes; technological aspects of information systems; the Internet; IT security and ethical issues; database management; and systems development life cycle. In addition, students familiarize themselves with the DePaul computing environment and demonstrate competency at navigating that environment. PREREQUISITE(S): none
    • IS 208
      Introduction to emerging information technologies and their impact on modern society. This course discusses the latest technologies used in the evolving IT environment and how these technologies are changing the modern world. Emphasis is placed on investigating issues using a variety of sources, case studies, and writing. PREREQUISITE(S): None
    • ISM 208
      Environments such as social networking sites, multiplayer online games and other online communities are becoming an increasingly large part of how we work, play, and learn. This course introduces the fundamentals for the interdisciplinary study of cyberculture and online social behavior. By examining core scholarship in this area, together with analyzing an existing virtual world, game, or online community, students will learn to research and understand new technologically-enabled social forms as they are emerging. PREREQUISITE(S) WRD 104
    • IT 201
      (Formerly IS 201 Introduction to Information Systems) This course demonstrates how information is used by organizations to conduct business and solve problems. This course presents information systems principles and demonstrates how they form an integral part of modern organizations. Topics include systems concepts; organizational processes; technological aspects of information systems; the Internet; IT security and ethical issues; database management; and systems development life cycle. In addition, students familiarize themselves with the DePaul computing environment and demonstrate competency at navigating that environment. PREREQUISITE(S): none
  • Understanding the Past
    • GAM 206
      From "The Royal Game of Ur" (2500+ BCE) to "World of Warcraft" (2004), games have been a constant in human history. The forms of games, their experiential qualities, and their cultural significance have varied enormously from era to era and place to place. This class will examine particular games and game genres in their historical context using a case study format. We will focus on "indoor" games, those of chance and skill, as opposed to physical games and sports. The examples will be chosen (i) to have global scope and historic diversity, (ii) to relate to games that students will find familiar, and (iii) to raise particular issues in historical interpretation, the use of primary sources and changing concepts of leisure activity.
    • GPH 205
      This course is a survey of the development, application and meaning of visual technologies in a wide range of world cultures from pre-history to the present. It traces the unique intersection of mathematics and physical culture that marks design science, as it has been realized in a variety of human societies. The course includes works of art that emphasize those mathematical and geometric elements that are antecedent to contemporary graphic technology.

Restrictions for CDM students

Courses offered in the student's primary major cannot be taken to fulfill LSP Domain requirements. For example, GAM 206 may not be applied as credit in the Understanding the Past domain for students majoring in Computer Game Development.

Additionally, CDM student cannot count a course as a liberal studies requirement and a major requirement. No double counting is allowed for CDM classes by CDM students.

Example 1

  • An Animation major CANNOT use ANI 206 to satisfy an arts and literature domain requirement because ANI 206 is required for all Animation majors.
  • An Animation major CAN take CSC 223 to satisfy a self, society and the modern world domain requirement. The course qualifies for the SSMW domain and it is not required in the Animation major.

Example 2

  • A Computer Science major CAN take GPH 259 to satisfy the Scientific Inquiry (SI)-Quantitative-Lab domain requirement because the course is not required by the CS major AND it counts for SI-Lab which is a required domain for CS students.
  • A Computer Science major CANNOT take CSC 250 to satisfy SI because, although the course is not required by any CDM major, it qualifies for SI-quantitative (not Lab) which is NOT a required domain for CDM students.

Example 3

  • A Computer Science major takes GD 200 for an arts and literature domain requirement. Although GD 200 is allowed as an elective even if it is not a 300 level course, the student CANNOT count the course both as satisfying an LSP domain AND as an elective for the CS program.