ClassInfo

IT 251 Introduction to Mobile Apps

Fall 2019-2020
Class number: 12901
Section number: 401
TuTh 10:10AM - 11:40AM
CDM 00658 Loop Campus
Course homepage: https://d2l.depaul.edu

Summary

IT 251 introduces students to the design, implementation and use of various mobile applications. Major topics include app design and creation, various tools to use in the design and creation of mobile apps, which type of app is best to design, how to be successful in marketing mobile apps, and how to market apps to various app stores, based on performance metrics and ratings. Core aspects of what it takes to develop a successful mobile application will be covered, and students will come away with deeper appreciation of mobile app ecosystems, design best practices, development workflow, and prototyping tools. We will also cover the some of the nuances of the different technological approaches including native, mobile web, and the increasingly popular hybrid approach.

We will use classroom presentations and discussions, online resources and virtual cloud computing networking services for specific lab exercises. Required coursework components and their contribution to the final grade will be:

a) In-class discussion/contributions (15%)
b) Written marketing plan (20%)
c) 8 (or more) homework/lab assignments (40%)
d) Final project (a complete, fully functional mobile application (25%)

Further details on each assignment will be distributed in class.



Texts

No textbook is required for this course. The instructor will provide all necessary materials.



Grading

This course is project based. There will be at least 8 assignments, each involved with creating, programming, and testing different app generators. Grades will be awarded as follows:

93-100% = A
90-92% = A-
87-89% = B+
83-86% = B
80-82% = B-
77-79% = C+
73-76% = C
70-72% = C-
67-69% = D+
60-66% = D
59-0% = F



Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course, although a basic knowledge of HTML5 and CSS3 will prove helpful.



Course Policies/Learning Domain Descriptions/Course Outcomes

ATTENDANCE: If you are absent or late for any reason, it is your responsibility to find out what you missed. The instructor will not contact you; you must take the initiative. Videos of all lectures will be available via D2L within 24 hours of the class lecture.

INCOMPLETE GRADES are awarded only in the most extraordinary of circumstances (a sudden, unplanned hospitalization or a death in the immediate family). An incomplete grade is a special, temporary grade that may be assigned by an instructor when unforeseeable circumstances prevent a student from completing course requirements by the end of the term and when otherwise the student had a record of satisfactory progress in the course. CDM policy requires the student to initiate the request for incomplete grade before the end of the term in which the course is taken. Prior to submitting the incomplete request, the student must discuss the circumstances with the instructor. Students may initiate the incomplete request process in MyCDM.

All incomplete requests must be approved by the instructor of the course and a CDM Associate Dean. Only exceptional cases will receive such approval.

If approved, students are required to complete all remaining course requirements independently in consultation with the instructor by the deadline indicated on the incomplete request form.

By default, an incomplete grade will automatically change to a grade of F after two quarters have elapsed (excluding summer) unless another grade is recorded by the instructor.

Incomplete grades do NOT grant the student permission to attend the same course in a future quarter.

DISABILITY SERVICES: Students who need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact:

Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD)
Lincoln Park Campus, Student Center 370, (773) 325-1677
Loop Campus, Lewis Center 1420, (312) 362-8002
csd@depaul.edu

CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM: This course will be subject to the academic integrity policy passed by faculty. More information can be found at http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/. The university and school policy on plagiarism can be summarized as follows: Students in this course should be aware of the strong sanctions that can be imposed against someone guilty of plagiarism. If proven, a charge of plagiarism could result in an automatic F in the course and possible expulsion. The strongest of sanctions will be imposed on anyone who submits as his/her own work any assignment which has been prepared by someone else. If you have any questions or doubts about what plagiarism entails or how to properly acknowledge source materials be sure to consult the instructor.

LEARNING DOMAIN DESCRIPTION: IT 251 is included in the Liberal Studies program as a course with credit in the Scientific Inquiry domain. Courses in the Scientific Inquiry domain are designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn the methods of modern science and its impact on the world around us. Courses are designed to help students develop a more complete perspective about science and the scientific process, including: an understanding of the major principles guiding modern scientific thought; a comprehension of the varying approaches and aspects of science; an appreciation of the connection among the sciences; the fundamental role of mathematics in practicing science; an awareness of the roles and limitations of theories and models in interpreting, understanding, and predicting natural phenomena; and a realization of how these theories and models change or are supplanted as our knowledge increases.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: By the end of this course, students will be able to: - Identify the ubiquitous use of mobile apps in everyday life - Demonstrate effects of poorly designed mobile apps and understand how to avoid creating them - Identify human behaviors and use this knowledge to build a more attractive and useful app - Develop a marketing strategy for apps they have designed - Design, develop, and create mobile apps in the framework of their choice - Understand the ecosystem of mobile app industry - Create a successful design for mobile apps - Know the development workflow - Understand the technology options they can choose to develop their apps

LEARNING DOMAIN OUTCOMES:
1. Students will understand the major principles guiding modern scientific thought and will be able to demonstrate a mastery of the science content knowledge of their SID courses.
2. Students will know that science, technology, and math serve as mechanisms for inquiry into the nature of the universe. Students will:
a. Identify questions that can be answered through scientific investigations
b. Design and conduct a scientific investigation to test a scientific hypothesis
c. Use appropriate tools and techniques together, analyze, and interpret data to support or refute a scientific hypothesis
d. Develop descriptions, explanations, predictions, and models using evidence
e. Describe relationships between evidence and explanations using critical and logical thinking
f. Recognize and analyze alternative explanations and predictions
g. Communicate scientific procedures and explanations
h. Use mathematics in all aspects of scientific inquiry
3. Students will understand and appreciate the interrelationships among science, technology and math. Students will:
a. Use technology and mathematics to identify a problem or design a solution to a problem
b. Give examples of how science and technology inform and influence each other
4. Students will understand and appreciate the role of science in society and in their lives. Students will:
a. Provide examples of how science and technology impact our lives, and how social needs and concerns impact our development of technology and scientific investigation
b. Develop positive attitudes towards science, technology, and mathematics
c. Establish an ongoing experiential/service-learning interest in science, technology, and mathematics
5. Students will understand the nature of science, technology, and mathematics. Students will:
a. Provide examples of the abuse of science, including the representation of unfalsifiable claims as science and other forms of pseudoscience
b. Explain the strengths and limits of scientific inquiry
c. Explain the difference between evidence and inference, and the provisional nature of scientific explanations by providing examples of how our understanding of the workings of the world has changed in the past
d. Explain the difference between probability and certainty, and describe what is meant by uncertainty in the context of science, technology, and mathematics

HOW LEARNING OUTCOMES WILL BE MET:
1. Through homework assignments, students will demonstrate a mastery of the science content knowledge.
2. Through lab assignments, students will design, build, and test mobile applications built with at least three different application building software packages.
3. By completing lab assignments on their own home computers, laptops or mobile devices, and cloud computing networks, students will understand and appreciate the role of the Internet in society and their lives
4. By contributing to required discussions about Internet uses, access, security and net neutrality, students will understand and appreciate the role of science in society and in their lives

WRITING EXPECTATIONS: Writing is integral for communicating ideas and progress in science, mathematics and technology. The form of writing in these disciplines is different from most other fields and includes, for example, mathematical equations, computer code, figures and graphs, lab reports and journals. Courses in the SI domain must include a writing component where the component is in a form appropriate for that course (e.g., lab reports, technical reports, etc.)

HOW WRITING EXPECTATIONS WILL BE MET: Students will write short reports explaining results of lab exercises. Students will be required to create a full marketing plan as part of their final project, using relevant technical resources from multiple external sources, and appropriate documentation approaches. This type of technical writing and presentation is an important communications skill; frequently required of any students, developers, or others involved in various aspects of computer and communication systems activities and enterprises.

CHANGES TO SYLLABUS: This syllabus is subject to change as necessary during the quarter. If a change occurs, it will be thoroughly addressed during class, posted under Announcements in D2L and sent via email.

ONLINE COURSE EVALUATIONS: Evaluations are a way for students to give feedback regarding their instructor and the course. Detailed feedback allows the instructor to tailor teaching methods and course content to meet the learning goals of the course and the academic needs of the students. They are a requirement of the course and are key to continue to provide you with the highest quality of teaching. The evaluations are anonymous; the instructor and administration do not track who entered what responses. A program is used to check if the student completed the evaluations, but the evaluation is completely separate from the student?s identity. Since 100% participation is our goal, students are sent periodic reminders over three weeks. Students do not receive reminders once they complete the evaluation. Students complete the evaluation online in CampusConnect.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND PLAGIARISM: This course is subject to the university's academic integrity policy, which can be found at http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/ . If you have any questions, consult with your professor.

ACADEMIC POLICIES: All students are required to manage their class schedules each term in accordance with the deadlines for enrolling and withdrawing as indicated in the University Academic Calendar. Information on enrollment, withdrawal, grading and incompletes can be found at: http://cdm.depaul.edu/enrollment.



Student Assistance

The Dean of Students Office (DoS) helps students in navigating the university, particularly during difficult situations, such as personal, financial, medical, and/or family crises. Absence notifications to faculty, late withdrawals, and community resource referrals support students both in and outside of the classroom. They also have resources and programs to support health and wellness, violence prevention, substance abuse and drug prevention, and LGBTQ student services. The DoS is committed to the success of all DePaul students. Feel free to contact them at http://studentaffairs.depaul.edu/dos/.


OPEN COMPUTER LABS: Students may use the following resource to locate open computer labs: http://www.cdm.depaul.edu/cim/academics/Pages/CIMLabResources.aspx



School policies:

Changes to Syllabus

This syllabus is subject to change as necessary during the quarter. If a change occurs, it will be thoroughly addressed during class, posted under Announcements in D2L and sent via email.

Online Course Evaluations

Evaluations are a way for students to provide valuable feedback regarding their instructor and the course. Detailed feedback will enable the instructor to continuously tailor teaching methods and course content to meet the learning goals of the course and the academic needs of the students. They are a requirement of the course and are key to continue to provide you with the highest quality of teaching. The evaluations are anonymous; the instructor and administration do not track who entered what responses. A program is used to check if the student completed the evaluations, but the evaluation is completely separate from the student’s identity. Since 100% participation is our goal, students are sent periodic reminders over three weeks. Students do not receive reminders once they complete the evaluation. Students complete the evaluation online in CampusConnect.

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

This course will be subject to the university's academic integrity policy. More information can be found at http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/ If you have any questions be sure to consult with your professor.

Academic Policies

All students are required to manage their class schedules each term in accordance with the deadlines for enrolling and withdrawing as indicated in the University Academic Calendar. Information on enrollment, withdrawal, grading and incompletes can be found at http://www.cdm.depaul.edu/Current%20Students/Pages/PoliciesandProcedures.aspx.

Students with Disabilities

Students who feel they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss their specific needs. All discussions will remain confidential.
To ensure that you receive the most appropriate accommodation based on your needs, contact the instructor as early as possible in the quarter (preferably within the first week of class), and make sure that you have contacted the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) at:
Lewis Center 1420, 25 East Jackson Blvd.
Phone number: (312)362-8002
Fax: (312)362-6544
TTY: (773)325.7296