ClassInfo

POST 100 Video Editing (Formerly DC 120)

Office: Meets in Classroom
Fall 2019-2020
Class number: 16007
Section number: 102
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
STDCT 00331 Lincoln Park Campus

Summary

Students will analyze and assemble various scenes shot under a variety of conditions and using different narrative strategies. Editing theories, techniques, and procedures, issues of continuity, effects, movement and sound will be examined as they relate to the fundamentals of cinematic montage and visual storytelling.

 



Texts

Recommended Text: Adobe Premiere Pro CC Classroom in a Book

Supplies:

REQUIRED EQUIPMENT: YOU MUST HAVE THE EXTERNAL MAC FORMATTED HARD DRIVE. An external Firewire or USB 2.0 hard drive, find these at Staples, Best Buy, etc.



Grading

1st Project - 20%;

2nd Project - 20%;

3rd Project - 20%;

4th project - 20%.

Each paper - 5% (total 20%)



Prerequisites

None



COURSE OBJECTIVES

To develop an understanding of the editing processes and gain basic editorial skills. Students will edit sequences together using nonlinear software. The following topics will be covered: Basic editing theory Nonlinear editing theory and practice Rules of composition as they relate to the edit. Critical analysis of the feature films, documentaries, and shorts
Textbooks and printed resources



Learning Domain Description

POST 100 Video Editing (Formerly DC 120) is included in the Liberal Studies program as a course with credit in the Arts and Literature domain. Courses in the Arts and Literature domain ask students to extend their knowledge and experience of the arts by developing their critical and reflective abilities. In these courses, students interpret and analyze particular creative works, investigate the relations of form and meaning and through critical and/or creative activity to come to experience art with greater openness, insight, and enjoyment. These courses focus on works of literature, art, theatre, or music as such, though the process of analysis may also include social and cultural issues. Students who take a course in this domain choose three courses from such choices as literature, the visual arts, media arts, music, and theater. No more than two courses can be chosen from one department or program.

 



Learning Outcomes

1. Students will be able to explain, in well-written prose, what video editing is and/or how it was produced. 2. Students will be able to comment on the relationship between various editing techniques and professional film content. 3. Students will be able to assess the formal aspects of their video editing and put those qualities into words, using, when appropriate, vocabulary employed in class and readings. 4. Students will be able to contextualize editing in various forms. They will be able to do so with respect to other films in terms of defining its place within a broader style or genre. They will also be able to contextualize a film in terms of contemporaneous aesthetic, social, or political concerns, discussing how these might shape the film's reception and how that reception might differ amongst various peoples and periods in film history. How Learning Outcomes Will Be Met 1. In-class screening and discussion of various films 2. In-class screening and discussion of student films 3. Vocabulary from books, handouts, and articles Writing Expectations Students will be expected to complete a minimum of 5-7 pages of writing for this course. How Writing Expectations Will Be Met Students write four papers analyzing characters, character?s obstacles (conflicts), how charter(s) plans to overcome the difficulties, how story develops, and resolutions of four films. Course Management System D2L 1. Students will be able to explain, in well-written prose, what video editing is and/or how it was produced. 2. Students will be able to comment on the relationship between various editing techniques and professional film content. 3. Students will be able to assess the formal aspects of their video editing and put those qualities into words, using, when appropriate, vocabulary employed in class and readings. 4. Students will be able to contextualize editing in various forms. They will be able to do so with respect to other films in terms of defining its place within a broader style or genre. They will also be able to contextualize a film in terms of contemporaneous aesthetic, social, or political concerns, discussing how these might shape the film?s reception and how that reception might differ amongst various peoples and periods in film history. How Learning Outcomes Will Be Met 1. In-class screening and discussion of various films 2. In-class screening and discussion of student films 3. Vocabulary from books, handouts, and articles Writing Expectations Students will be expected to complete a minimum of 5-7 pages of writing for this course. How Writing Expectations Will Be Met Students write four papers analyzing characters, character?s obstacles (conflicts), how charter(s) plans to overcome the difficulties, how story develops, and resolutions of four films. Course Management System D2L



School policies:

Changes to Syllabus

This syllabus is subject to change as necessary during the quarter. If a change occurs, it will be thoroughly addressed during class, posted under Announcements in D2L and sent via email.

Online Course Evaluations

Evaluations are a way for students to provide valuable feedback regarding their instructor and the course. Detailed feedback will enable the instructor to continuously tailor teaching methods and course content to meet the learning goals of the course and the academic needs of the students. They are a requirement of the course and are key to continue to provide you with the highest quality of teaching. The evaluations are anonymous; the instructor and administration do not track who entered what responses. A program is used to check if the student completed the evaluations, but the evaluation is completely separate from the student’s identity. Since 100% participation is our goal, students are sent periodic reminders over three weeks. Students do not receive reminders once they complete the evaluation. Students complete the evaluation online in CampusConnect.

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

This course will be subject to the university's academic integrity policy. More information can be found at http://academicintegrity.depaul.edu/ If you have any questions be sure to consult with your professor.

Academic Policies

All students are required to manage their class schedules each term in accordance with the deadlines for enrolling and withdrawing as indicated in the University Academic Calendar. Information on enrollment, withdrawal, grading and incompletes can be found at http://www.cdm.depaul.edu/Current%20Students/Pages/PoliciesandProcedures.aspx.

Students with Disabilities

Students who feel they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss their specific needs. All discussions will remain confidential.
To ensure that you receive the most appropriate accommodation based on your needs, contact the instructor as early as possible in the quarter (preferably within the first week of class), and make sure that you have contacted the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) at:
Lewis Center 1420, 25 East Jackson Blvd.
Phone number: (312)362-8002
Fax: (312)362-6544
TTY: (773)325.7296