GameLabs

Game Labs

While students in our game programs have access to all CDM labs, several labs are devoted solely to gaming, including game development and research labs, a gameplay lab, and playtest and usability labs.

Game Development and Research Labs: The Game Dev and Game Research labs are open to students registered for selected courses to work on classroom and research-related projects. Combined, they house 24 development stations with high-end gaming PCs, dual monitors, consoles, and the appropriate software for mixed game development.

Gameplay Lab: The Gameplay Lab features 24 AlienWare computers designed specifically for gaming as well as multiple game consoles with a library of games.

Deep Games Laboratory: The Deep Games Lab is a cross-disciplinary design, research, development and assessment game lab. Faculty, students, and industry collaborators make and evaluate games, interactive documentaries and transmedia projects that aim to promote personal and social change. This work builds bridges between students and faculty, academia and industry, producers and users, and different departments within DePaul.

Divergent Design Lab: The Divergent Design Lab is a research and design lab that focuses on interface, play, collaboration, and distribution. Critical design is used to decode value systems and encode underrepresented ideas. Projects involve producing interactive experiences through emerging media practices. Email lab co-directors Jessica Westbrook or Adam Trowbridge for more information.

Virtual and Augmented Design Lab: Located on the concourse level of the DePaul Center, the new Virtual and Augmented Design Lab (VAD) hosts classes and projects to research and develop experimental games on emerging platforms. VAD is equipped with Microsoft HoloLenses, AR headsets/visors, HTC Vives, VR headsets with hand and foot trackers, Oculus Rifts, iPhones for augmented reality development, and Macs and PCs. The lab is directed by Brian Schrank.

Playtest and Usability Lab: In this lab, students learn how to collect (unbiased) game play data that will help design/development teams make better games. The Software Observation and Usability Lab (SOUL) is a player-user research space available for reservation by faculty and students with two rooms (an observation room and a player-participant room) separated by a one-way mirror. It is capable of supporting multiple types of studies that include (but are not limited to): usability using Morae, eyetracking (Tobii), games user research (usability and playtesting), and focus groups or interviews.